Welcome to the Bressingham Gardens

Welcome to the Bressingham Gardens. A paradise for gardeners with two beautiful six acre gardens, created by Alan and Adrian Bloom over many years where new features are still being developed and planned.

The Plants

Inspirational Design

All Seasons Bed at Foggy Bottom garden

The All Seasons Bed at Foggy Bottom in September. Both younger and mature specimens of conifers have been interplanted with heathers and ornamental grasses. The most striking grass is the river of Imperata cylindrical Rubra, the Japanese Blood Grass. In the left foreground is Cedrus deodara Feeling Blue.

Let’s start with the question; do you need to have training as a garden designer to create dramatic and pleasing plant oriented design? Of course not, although many might choose this option, just as many will get ideas from books on gardens and be inspired to want to create their own design and plant combinations. We hope you will find some of our ideas shown in the images on this website inspirational, and even more so when you visit us at Bressingham Gardens. Here is a beginning …….

Arguably the most interesting and enjoyable activities in gardening are designing (not necessarily on paper) and planting a new bed or border. Gardening certainly involves maintenance, but we can all be creative in small or bigger ways when we look at how we can enhance our garden. At Bressingham we have planted and replanted on a grand scale over many years, but many of the ideas and combinations can be adapted for smaller gardens too. In recent years Adrian Bloom in particular has created planting combinations with conifers, shrubs, perennials and grasses in The Winter Garden, The Summer Garden, The Fragrant Garden, Adrian’s Wood and above all Foggy Bottom. Some of those are shown in the images below. Please refer to Blooms Best for further information and Adrian Bloom’s most recent book Blooms Best Perennials and Grasses (etc.)

 

Brunnera macrophylla Jack Frost

As the garden has matured at Foggy Bottom, conifers, trees and shrubs have been thinned, vistas opened up, and here another “river” in a shady position, of Brunnera macrophylla Jack Frost has been planted. It is seen here in early spring the new shoots of Hosta Krossa Regal showing through the bark mulched surface……..

 

Siberian Bugloss (Brunnera macrophylla Jack Frost) and Funkia

……… now in summer the true value of perennials are seen, the finely marked leaves of the Brunnera forming a stream between taller plants, such as the Hosta and evergreen fern, Dryopteris erythrosaura. The view is now from the other end of the planting.

Hakonechloa macra and Ophiopogon planiscapus nigrescens

Minimalist in variety, but this design by Adrian Bloom uses one shrub, Cornus alba Aurea, one conifer, Taxus baccata Robusta, one grass, Hakonechloa macra and one perennial, the everblack Ophiopogon planiscapus Nigrescens to create a scene of year round interest …….

Hakonechloa macra and Ophiopogon planiscapus nigrescens

……. This is on the edge of the Summer and Winter Garden and keeping with geographical terms Adrian has created a “black sea”, with a breaking wave of Hakonechloa. This now in late autumn shows the red stems of the Cornus highlighted by the dark green pillars of Taxus, autumnal tones of the grass...

...if your garden is not likely to be covered in snow all winter, this planting can still add drama to the winter season, here on a frosty morning which sunlight can transform as it touches the stems and foliage.

Hakonechloa macra Alboaurea, Heuchera Silver Lode

A stream or river of Hakonechloa macra Aureola (similar to H.m. Alboaurea) designed by Adrian at the zu Jeddeloh “Blooms” garden in northern Germany. This flows towards and around the base of a Japanese Pine, to the left is one of the best of Heucheras, H. Silver Scrolls, the pink beyond a Japanese Anemone, A.x hybrida Party Dress.

Funkia (Hosta 'Shade Fanfare')

Hostas make great rivers or ponds this at Foggy Bottom has Hosta Shade Fanfare meandering through part of the garden, encircling Hosta Buckshaw Blue beneath a Japanese Maple. Slugs of course have to be discouraged (we use pellets at Bressingham when necessary).